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BYCULLA LANDMARKS

BYCULLA LANDMARKS

Byculla today boasts renowned, Victorian architecture and historic monuments. Churches, gardens, colleges and other treasures are enjoying new life as the area enters an era of unprecedented transformation.

BOTANICAL GARDENS & ZOO DESTINATION Byculla
Bhau Daji Lad Museum

Bhau Daji Lad Museum

The Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum (formerly the Victoria and Albert Museum) is the oldest museum in Mumbai. Situated in Byculla East, it was originally established in 1855 as a treasure house of the decorative and industrial arts, and was later renamed in honour of Bhau Daji.

The construction of the present building in Jijamata Udyan in Byculla started in 1862 and was completed in 1871. The museum was opened on May 2, 1872. In 1975, this museum was renamed as the Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum.

Between 2003 and 2007, this museum has undergone a major restoration under the supervision of the Mumbai chapter of the Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage and financed by the Jamnalal Bajaj Trust.

This museum houses a large number of archaeological finds, maps and historical photographs of Mumbai, clay models, silver and copper ware and costumes. Its significant collections include a 17th-century manuscript of Hatim Tai. Outside the museum is the installation of the monolithic basalt elephant sculpture recovered from the sea, which originated from Elephanta Island (Gharapuri Island).

Roman Catholic Gloria Church

Roman Catholic Gloria Church

The Cathedral of the Holy Name is a Roman Catholic cathedral in the Indian city of Mumbai (Bombay) and the seat of the Archbishop of Bombay and headquarters of the Archdiocese of Bombay . The cathedral is located in the Colaba area in South Mumbai. The residence of the Archbishop is located adjacent to the Cathedral.

This Cathedral was built to replace the older Cathedral which was located in the Bhuleshwar area of the city, where there are few resident Christians. That site was sold off, and the former parochial church of the Holy Name in Colaba was elevated as the Pro-Cathedral.

The site of this church is very close to the site of the former Portuguese Church of Our Lady of Hope, or Nossa Senhora da Esperanca, that was confiscated by the English from the Padroado party and handed over to the Propaganda party's Vicar Apostolic Athanasius Hartmann. The Esperanca Church was demolished by the Propagandists soon after, and in its place the present Esperanca Building, also called the Eucharistic Congress Building, behind the Holy Name Cathedral, was built to house the delegates to the 38th International Eucharistic Congress in the 1960s.

It is known for its frescoes, pipe organ, a large gold embroidered stole gifted by Pope John XXIII, and another by Pope Pius XII containing the red hat given to Cardinal Valerian Gracias, and a bell gifted by Pope Paul VI during the 38th International Eucharistic Congress held in Mumbai in 1964.

It is one of the two more known cathedrals in the city, the other being the older, Anglican, Cathedral of St. Thomas the Apostle. Other Cathedrals in the city include those of the Jacobites and the Syro-Malankara Rite,

In addition, there were at least two other buildings which, while not strictly Cathedrals, were popularly styled as being Pro-Cathedrals of the Padroado party Bishop of Daman, who resided normally at the Portuguese government-owned Blessed Sacrament Chapel in Middle Colaba — St. Francis Xavier Church in Dabul and the Church of Our Lady of Glory (Nossa Senhora da Gloria) or Gloria Church in Byculla.

The American Express Bakery

The American Express Bakery

Diehard foodies swear by the culinary offerings of The American Express Bakery on Clare Road – an almost century-old business founded in the city by a Goan immigrant, Joseph Carvalho. Named American Express due to its speedy catering to the ships coming in to the harbour, the family-run bakery continues to woo customers in the present-day as well. Retaining an old-world feel with its antique tables and chairs, it transports guests back to a gentler period, an effect that is enhanced by the various advertisements from the earlier decades that line the walls – as the concoctions continue to draw their essence from age-old recipes. When the festive seasons loom large on the calendar, the smells from the bakery become even more inviting. It has successfully stood the test of time creating its popular breads – also on sale are delectable tea cakes, vanilla cream tarts, almond macaroons, puff rolls, plum cakes and more. As more and more palates are pleased – and generations remain loyal to its offerings – at the American Express Bakery time seems to stand still as it serves up fare that is beautifully coloured by the essence of the past.

Motisha Jain Derasar

Motisha Jain Derasar

Second biggest temple after Walkeshwar's Jain temple. It was built and funded by Seth Motisha after whom this main street is named. It was built many years ago and is famous for the main Jain festivals that are celebrated here. 

Khada Parsi

Khada Parsi

Dotting the cityscape of Mumbai are statues of renowned men and women who played an important role in shaping it. Among these is the impressive sculpture of Shet Cursetjee Manockjee (1763-1845), an eminent Parsi businessman and education reformer. Located at the bustling Byculla flyover junction, the 40 feet cast-iron statue features a composition of the figure of Cursetjee Manockjee standing tall on a towering Corinthian pillar. The work was commissioned in the 1860s by Manockjee Cursetjee, Cursetjee Manockjee’s youngest son, as a tribute to his illustrious father. Its design is said to have drawn inspiration from the impressive sculpture that was crafted as a central monument dedicated to the goddess Ceres for the Independence Square at Concepción, Chile. The iconic statue, that graced the junction long before it was bestowed with flyovers, came to be known as Khada Parsi or Standing Parsi. The statue was later gifted, by the family, to the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation. Listed as a Grade I heritage structure, the monument – that had suffered the ravages of time – underwent nearly two years of restoration, and was subsequently unveiled in June 2014 to enjoy its spot in the sun! Today, amidst chaotic traffic, blaring horns and the maze of flyovers, the illustrious gentleman stands serenely, watching over his area – and the city that never sleeps.

Hasanabad Mausoleum

Hasanabad Mausoleum

In the heart of Byculla is a quiet centre of reverence. An elegant gateway to a spacious compound leads to a quiet mausoleum, which is the eternal resting place of Imam Hasan Ali Shah Mehalatee (1800-1881), the 46th Ismaili Iman, the religious head of the Nizari Ismailis. He had been titled Aga Khan (Chief Commander), in 1818, by the King Fateh Ali Shah of Persia, and was the first Aga Khan. Constrained to leave Persia in 1841, Aga Khan I travelled to India, his new home, by land with a large group including relatives, dependents, associates, supporters and employees. He arrived in Bombay in 1846; the community settled in their new surroundings and in course of time, the following grew. After the Aga Khan I passed away on 12th April 1881 a majestic mausoleum of sandstone and white marble from Iran was built in his honour, where he rests in eternal peace. Its facade is graced with arches that lead to a passageway that edges all four sides of the central chamber that bears his cenotaph. One large central dome and two smaller domes surmount the elegant structure and soaring corner minarets enhance its beauty. For more than a century, the mausoleum has been a centre of prayer, offering solace and sanctuary to the Ismaili community.

Magen David Synagogue

Magen David Synagogue

Erected in 1864, the synagogue was constructed by David Sassoon in Victorian style for the growing population of Baghdadi Jews whom had fled from prosecution of the governor and Wali of Baghdad, the extortioner Daud Pasha.By 1910, the Jewish community in the neighbourhood of Byculla had increased to the extent that the synagogue could no longer service all the devotees and the synagogue was extended with the help of Jacob, David Sassoon's grandson.

The synagogue is one of the largest in Asia outside of Israel.

Within the extensive grounds of the Synagogue there are two Jewish Schools which are operated by the Sir Jacob Sassoon High School Trust and the E.E.E. Sassoon High School Trust, in which Jewish children were originally educated. Over time most of the Bagdadi Jews moved to the more affluent Colaba area or abroad to Israel, Australia, Britain and Canada. With the scarcity of Jewish students the Schools have opened to all communities and currently provides for the population in the vicinity, which is 98% Muslim.

In 2011 for the celebration of the 150th anniversary the Synagogue was restored.

Mazagon Dock

Mazagon Dock

For centuries, little disturbed the quiet pace of life of small communities living on the isolated islands of Bombay, as they panned salt, cultivated rice, gathered coconuts and fished. The arrival of settlers from Gujarat in the 13th century quickened the pace of life, and the islands soon became a cynosure of ambitious rulers, both Indian and foreign! With the islands being ceded to the Portuguese in 1534 and being handed over to the British in the 1660s, trading and shipping developed. With these developments came the expansion of Mumbai harbour and docks. Among the significant dockyards is Mazagon Dock Limited, India’s prime shipyard, whose origins to back to a small dry dock built in 1774. Over the ensuing centuries, the growth of the dock went hand in hand with that of the country, and its ownership changed hands.

Into the 21st century, Mazagon Dock Limited is India’s leading shipbuilding and offshore fabrication yard; it offers services to the shipping world, Indian Navy, Coast Guard and ONGC. It has manufactured warships, submarines, fast missile boats, a cadet training ship and other utility ships for the Indian Navy; offshore platforms and associated support vessels for offshore oil drilling; floating police stations for the Border Security Force; and tankers, cargo bulk carriers, passenger ships and ferries. The yard also manufactures vessels that can clean oil spills and fight fires on offshore drilling platforms. The team at MDL is continually trained to be in tune with the latest developments in shipbuilding. With its remarkable capabilities and commitment to be one of the most loaded shipyards in the world, ‘The Shipbuilder to the Nation’ is indeed the pride of the nation!