A WINDOW TO THE PAST

about Byculla

During the late 18th century, Byculla was an extension of Mazagaon, one of the seven islands that originally formed the city of Mumbai. Byculla used to house many of the city's textile manufacturing until the mills closed up shop and moved out of the island city. Byculla, like many other parts of Mumbai have witnessed strong real estate growth, particularly in the Motisha Lane area whose tall residential buildings, occupied by the affluent Jain community.

WINDOW TO
THE PAST

Piramal Aranya draws inspiration from the rich history on the ground it stands on.

During the late 18th century, Byculla was an extension of Mazagaon, one of the seven islands that originally formed the city of Mumbai.  Byculla used to house many of the city's textile manufacturing until the mills closed up shop and moved out of the island city. Byculla, like many other parts of Mumbai, has witnessed strong real estate growth, particularly in the Motisha Lane area, whose tall residential buildings are occupied by the affluent Jain community.

Byculla today boasts renowned, Victorian architecture and historic monuments. Churches, gardens, colleges and other treasures are enjoying new life as the area enters an era of unprecedented transformation.

Byculla’s tradition of elegance dates back to the nineteenth century, when it became a prosperous suburb of Mumbai and the site of the grand home and synagogue built by sir David Dassoon, as well as a beautiful gothic church. Byculla’s bustling railway station was completed in 1857.

Visitors have flocked to Byculla to visit its historic sites for nearly two hundred years. One of the oldest zoos in the country, Jijamata Udyan, sits on the western edge of Piramal Aranya, and the famous Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Museum can be found within its gardens.

The aquamarine Magen David Synagogue, Catholic Gloria Church and the incredible Jain temple attract spiritual seekers and secular explorers alike.

Colors and culture, prosperity and playfulness make Piramal Aranya an ideal match for this historic neighborhood.

THE HEART
OF
CULTURE

The oldest museum in Mumbai, the Dr.
Bhau Daji Lad Museum is a showcase of the region’s culture and history, housing various archaeological finds, historic maps and photographs of Mumbai, clay models, silver and copper ware and costumes. In 2005, the museum won UNESCO’s Award of Excellence in Cultural Conservation, and an extraordinary new wing designed by New York’s Steven Holl will
open in 2018.

Formerly known as Victoria Gardens, Jijamata Udyan is Mumbai’s famous zoo and sprawling garden on Aranya’s western edge. A full renovation of the museum, first opened in 1862, will be completed by 2018. Spectacular beauty and rich cultural opportunities lay right at your feet.

  • 60 ACRE BOTANICAL GARDEN
  • HISTORIC JIJAMATA UDYAN ZOO
  • DR. BHAU DAJI LAD MUSEUM
  • MAGEN DAVID SYNAGOGUE
  • ROMAN – CATHOLIC GLORIA CHURCH
  • STUNNING JAIN TEMPLE MOTISHA APESWARI JAIN MANDIR
  • SPRAWLING FRUIT
AND VEGETABLE MARKET
  • PARSI FIRE TEMPLE
  • EXCELLENT CONNECTIVITY AND PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
  • AN UNPRECEDENTED PROJECT
  • ARANYA REDEFINES THE SOUTH MUMBAI SKYLINE IN THE HEART OF BYCULLA
  • From the centre of south Mumbai, take in the breadth of the city’s history
and variety—from its timeless monuments, its bustling urban centre and the ‘good harbour’ (baum bei) from which it received its name.

Botanical
Gardens

An ornamental gateway and railing, a triple arched architectural screen, the charming Graeco-Roman style building (now the Dr Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum), the 67-ft-high David Sassoon Clock Tower built in the Palladian style, and a stone elephant statue (that once stood at Elephanta Island in the Mumbai harbour) enhance its appeal. The zoo, started in 1890, with birds and animals in different habitats, is a popular tourist attraction.

The gardens were renamed Veer Mata Jijabai Bhosale Udyan and Zoo in the memory of Maratha warrior Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj’s mother, and a sculpture of Jijamata and young Shivaji was added the premises. Now home to old and rare plants and trees, the historic botanical gardens continue to be a precious green lung in the heart of a bustling metropolis.